Monday, September 29, 2014

psadmin 8.54

Peoplesotools 8.54 made few changes in the main menu of psadmin. I thought to find easily docs in Peoplebooks PSADMIN utility description, but it’s not really straight away. So, I decided to write it down to keep ref.

Application domain :
Whether there’s still 28 options in the menu, one has been added, one has been removed.

Let’s see first the menu. Left side psadmin menu from Peopletools 8.53, right side Peopletools 8.54.
 PSADMIN_001
The option 13 (right side) has been added. The “Push Notifications” is an entire new concept. It seems promising even though quite complex to build. Once set in the configuration file, you have to do a lot of configurations from the front-end.
Find out more here in the Peoplebooks : Understanding the Push Notification Framework.
Pay attention to the system requirements, it’s not yet supported on WebSphere, only available for Weblogic.

The option 24 (left side) has been dropped. I suppose this is following the Peopletools end support for Sybase and Informix announced a month ago, since this was only required for those plateform. Amusingly, the Peoplebooks 8.54 have not been updated, this is still referenced (see Sartup Option).

Process Scheduler :
One option dropped, 2 added.

As above, here below screenshot for Process scheduler psadmin menu. Left side psadmin menu from Peopletools 8.53, right side Peopletools 8.54.
 PSADMIN_002
The option 13 “ServerName” (left side) has been removed. Same remark as above, only required for Sybase and Informix, since there are out of support, that’s fine.

From the right side – Peopletools 8.54 - two more options. Option 3) “Domains Gateway” and 4) “Push Notifications”. Nothing in the Peoplebooks regarding those two parameters for Process Scheduler. We have to assume it’s functioning the same way as for the Application server.

Other :
Do you want one more ?
Check the configuration file of application server (actually process scheduler as well), you‘ll see the added feature “InMemory” options:
 PSADMIN_003
The result search on Peoplebooks 8.54 returns nothing but “Your search term inmemorydbname did not match any topics.” I’d expect a reference to this configuration file description. Too bad. How are we supposed to use it ?

Sorry Oracle, but that documentation is weak.

Nicolas.

Friday, September 26, 2014

Script PIA and psadmin

Depending of how you are coding your script to start/stop your webserver, it might not work.

Small example:
[root@vv-cephei-b ~]# cat start_hcm92dmo_web.sh
su - hcm92 <<EOF
psadmin -w start -d peoplesoft
exit
EOF
[root@vv-cephei-b ~]# sh ./start_hcm92dmo_web.sh
Last login: Fri Sep 26 10:33:57 CEST 2014

Starting the domain [peoplesoft].
General Exception: null

java.lang.NullPointerException
        at com.peoplesoft.pt.psadmin.ui.Progress.<init>(Progress.java:135)
        at com.peoplesoft.pt.psadmin.ui.Progress.getInstance(Progress.java:123)
        at com.peoplesoft.pt.psadmin.pia.DomainBootHandler.BootWlsServer(DomainBootHandler.java:84)
        at com.peoplesoft.pt.psadmin.pia.DomainBootHandler.run(DomainBootHandler.java:62)
        at com.peoplesoft.pt.psadmin.pia.PIAAdminCmdLine.startDomain(PIAAdminCmdLine.java:270)
        at com.peoplesoft.pt.psadmin.pia.PIAAdminCmdLine.run(PIAAdminCmdLine.java:481)
        at com.peoplesoft.pt.psadmin.PSAdmin.runSwitched(PSAdmin.java:170)
        at com.peoplesoft.pt.psadmin.PSAdmin.main(PSAdmin.java:232)
[root@vv-cephei-b ~]#

It seems to be a known bug prior Peopletools 8.54:
Trying to Start or Stop WebLogic using psadmin while using Cron Results in Error - General Exception: null - java.lang.NullPointerException (Doc ID 1908227.1)
According to the note, it should be solved in Peopletools 8.54, and obviously it is not for me... even though I'm on the newest one, 8.54.03.

Now, rewording the script:
[root@vv-cephei-b ~]# cat start_hcm92dmo_web.sh
su - hcm92 -c "psadmin -w start -d peoplesoft"
[root@vv-cephei-b ~]# sh ./start_hcm92dmo_web.sh

Starting the domain [peoplesoft].......
Server state changed to STARTING.........
Server state changed to STANDBY..
Server state changed to STARTING..............
Server state changed to ADMIN..
Server state changed to RESUMING....
Server state changed to RUNNING..
Verifying domain status.
The domain has started.

[root@vv-cephei-b ~]#

Much better ! Bug solved.

Nicolas.

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Oracle Linux 7 : ps command as root produces a WARNING

When running a “ps” command as root user on Oracle Linux 7 (and CentOS 7), you may see the following :

root       694     1  0 09:01 ?        00:00:00 /usr/bin/abrt-watch-log -F Backtrace /var/log/Xorg.0.log -- /usr/bin/abrt-dump-xorg -xD
root       692     1  0 09:01 ?        00:00:00 /usr/bin/abrt-watch-log -F BUG: WARNING: at WARNING: CPU: INFO: possible recursive locking detected ernel BUG at list_del corruption list_add corruption do_IRQ: stack overflow: ear stack overflow (cur: eneral protection fault nable to handle kernel ouble fault: RTNL: assertion failed eek! page_mapcount(page) went negative! adness at NETDEV WATCHDOG ysctl table check failed : nobody cared IRQ handler type mismatch Machine Check Exception: Machine check events logged divide error: bounds: coprocessor segment overrun: invalid TSS: segment not present: invalid opcode: alignment check: stack segment: fpu exception: simd exception: iret exception: /var/log/messages -- /usr/bin/abrt-dump-oops –xtD

Note that, at the least, we can read “ernel” where we could expect “kernel”, “eneral” instead of “general”, “nable” instead of “unable”, “ysctl” instead of “sysctl”. Not very nice.

Whether it looks like a bug, it seems not to be. Please read that interesting description Red Hat Bugzilla – Bug 976581. It’s explained the first letter is explicitly not there to be able to catch both capital/lower letter.
It’s an old bug report, a new one has also been reported more recently for CentOS 7 on CentOS bug Tracker. Minor, but it’s worth to keep an eye.

Nicolas.

Restart CREATE_TEMP_TABLE won’t work

Whilst I was running the database setup of a brand new FSCM 92 Peopletools 8.54 database, the server has all of sudden crashed down.
Once restarted, checking the logs files produced by the DMS script, I was able to determine the step it was doing when it stopped. It was the very last step, CREATE_TEMP_TABLE.
Here’s the beginning of that log :
TMP_854_004
Since the server crashed without notice, it ends in the middle of nowhere and without error. There is nothing much about restarted this step in the Peopletools installation guide, I thought restart would simply work straight away…

And here start the troubles :
TMP_854_001  
As you may see, the command restarts from the beginning. But it dramatically failed on a table it was successful at the first place.
The guilty here is the table PSPTMATVWDEP which does not exists. What ?
TMP_854_002 
Indeed, it does not.
And now what ? Looking at all the logs files of load (epengs.log, epengl.log…), that table is “missing”.

I found a very old note on MOS – actually from 2010 !, “How can you restart Data Mover for the CREATE_TEMP_TABLE command (Doc ID 660214.1)”. It is clearly mentioned that CREATE_TEMP_TABLE cannot be restarted. If it fails for some reason, two ways :
1. if you don’t have to upgrade your database to the latest Peopletools release, open AppDesigner, create a new project, insert all the temp tables (or from the first it failed on till the end, cf log file) and build.
You should see something like this :
TMP_854_006

2. if you have to update your database to the latest Peopletools release, then continue (Task 7-2: Updating Database to Latest PeopleTools Release) and run what described above afterwards.
Just for info, that table PSPTMATVWDEP is created in rel854xx :
TMP_854_003

It was new to me. Never late for learning…

Should I say that whether table is mandatory, it is empty ? Also empty on image FSCM92008… Hmmm.

Enjoy,

Nicolas.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Windows Power Shell does not know psae

I’ve never notice it before, probably already known by most of you guys. But whilst I was building a Peoplesoft database from within Windows 2012R2, I ran psae (PSADMIN AppEngine) from a Windows Power Shell command prompt.
And here what I got:

PS E:\pt854\bin\client\winx86> psae
psae : The term 'psae' is not recognized as the name of a cmdlet, function, script file, or operable program. Check
the spelling of the name, or if a path was included, verify that the path is correct and try again.
At line:1 char:1
+ psae
+ ~~~~
    + CategoryInfo          : ObjectNotFound: (psae:String) [], CommandNotFoundException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : CommandNotFoundException

Suggestion [3,General]: The command psae was not found, but does exist in the current location. Windows PowerShell does
    not load commands from the current location by default. If you trust this command, instead type ".\psae". See "get-help
    about_Command_Precedence" for more details.
PS E:\pt854\bin\client\winx86>

Well, probably not a big deal, but good to know and worth a try what is recommanded, since I trust this psae command:

PS E:\pt854\bin\client\winx86> .\psae
Invalid command line argument list.
  process command line:
  GUID command line   : <unavailable>
Usage:
    psae -CT <dbtype>
         -CS <server>
         -CD <database name>
         -CI <connect id>
         -CW <connect password>
         -CO <oprid>
         -CP <oprpswd>
         -R  <run control id>
         -AI <program id>
         -I  <process instance>
         -DEBUG <Y|N>
         -DR <Y|N>
         -NOCOMMIT <Y|N>
         -TRACE <value>
         -DBFLAGS <value>
         -TOOLSTRACESQL <value>
         -TOOLSTRACEPC <value>
         -OT <output type>
         -OF <output format>
         -FP <file path>
  or
    psae <parmfile>
PS E:\pt854\bin\client\winx86>

Of course, we can also still use the good old Windows DOS cmd :
PS E:\pt854\bin\client\winx86> cmd
Microsoft Windows [Version 6.3.9600]
(c) 2013 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

E:\pt854\bin\client\winx86>psae
Invalid command line argument list.
  process command line:
  GUID command line   : <unavailable>
Usage:
    psae -CT <dbtype>
         -CS <server>
         -CD <database name>
         -CI <connect id>
         -CW <connect password>
         -CO <oprid>
         -CP <oprpswd>
         -R  <run control id>
         -AI <program id>
         -I  <process instance>
         -DEBUG <Y|N>
         -DR <Y|N>
         -NOCOMMIT <Y|N>
         -TRACE <value>
         -DBFLAGS <value>
         -TOOLSTRACESQL <value>
         -TOOLSTRACEPC <value>
         -OT <output type>
         -OF <output format>
         -FP <file path>
  or
    psae <parmfile>

E:\pt854\bin\client\winx86>

Nicolas.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

We’ve detected that your operating system is not supported by this website

For many, many years, the Peoplesoft users know this (infamous) message on the login page when using, well, a non-supported OS by Peoplesoft.
I remember Duncan found a workaround to hide this message, find out more here. Already 4 years ago…

Maybe I’m out of date by using my old – but very well running – laptop on Windows XP Pro SP3, here it is within the image HCM92004 (Peopletools 8.53.xx) :
PTOOLS854_WEB_OS_002 

What a surprise with the last image HCM92008 (Peopletools 8.54.02), using the same browser and of course the same old laptop and OS, the message is just gone :
PTOOLS854_WEB_OS_004

Nice, but probably time for an OS upgrade anyway !

Nicolas.

Addendum (19-Sept-2014): if my test was done on Firefox 30.0, it’s worth to read PeopleTools Simplifies Internet Explorer Certifications

Monday, September 15, 2014

VMWare ESXi vSphere 5.5 update 2 and guest OS

As of the 1st of August 2014, VMWare ESXi 5.5 supports Oracle Linux 7. 1.5 months after RHEL 7 and 2-3 weeks after CentOS 7.
And good news, from the 5.5 update 2 released last week, we can set it for new guests from the Client:
HCM92008_027 
Note that’s only for the 64-bit version of OS. Surprisingly, whether RHEL 7 64-bit is officially also supported, it’s not listed here…
Or, from within an existing guest:
HCM92008_029  

Find out more about VMWare Compatibility Guide.

Nicolas.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

VirtualBox Appliances for PeopleSoft on VMWare ESXi (bis)

Written in April last year, my procedure to move the Peoplesoft appliance to VMWare ESXi – see here – seems to be broken since image #6… My test was on image #3…
One of the reader found its own way and kindly shared experience, you can find here how to work around.

Right now we are on image #8, the first one ever on Peopletools 8.54. Time to have a shot.

1. I decided first to follow my own procedure and see.
1.1 OVF changes
First, the ovf file setting changes, very few are needed compared to last year :
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# diff HCMDB-SES-854-01.ovf HCMDB-SES-854-01.ovf.tmp
34c34
<     <OperatingSystemSection ovf:id="109">
---
>     <OperatingSystemSection ovf:id="101">
36,37c36,37
<       <Description>Oracle_64</Description>
<       <vbox:OSType ovf:required="false">Oracle_64</vbox:OSType>
---
>       <Description>oracleLinux64Guest</Description>
>       <vbox:OSType ovf:required="false">oracleLinux64Guest</vbox:OSType>
45c45
<         <vssd:VirtualSystemType>virtualbox-2.2</vssd:VirtualSystemType>
---
>         <vssd:VirtualSystemType>vmx-07</vssd:VirtualSystemType>
Nothing else.

1.2 ovftool control file
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# echo "lax" > .ovftool
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# echo "datastore=vm" >> .ovftool
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# echo "skipManifestCheck" >> .ovftool
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# echo "overwrite" >> .ovftool
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# echo "powerOffTarget" >> .ovftool
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# echo "net:HostOnly=VM Network 2" >> .ovftool
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# echo "annotation=Peopletools 8.54">> .ovftool
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# echo "name=HCM92008" >> .ovftool

1.3 Push to ESXi
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# ovftool --version
VMware ovftool 3.5.0 (build-1274719)
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# ovftool HCMDB-SES-854-01.ovf vi://root:pwd@192.168.1.10:443
Opening OVF source: HCMDB-SES-854-01.ovf
Opening VI target: vi://root@192.168.1.10:443/
Deploying to VI: vi://root@192.168.1.10:443/
Transfer Completed
Warning:
- Wrong file size specified in OVF descriptor for 'HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk1.vmdk' (specified: -1, actual 2258674176).
- Wrong file size specified in OVF descriptor for 'HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk2.vmdk' (specified: -1, actual 3552615424).
- Wrong file size specified in OVF descriptor for 'HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk3.vmdk' (specified: -1, actual 8894975488).
- Wrong file size specified in OVF descriptor for 'HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk4.vmdk' (specified: -1, actual 7227696640).
- Wrong file size specified in OVF descriptor for 'HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk5.vmdk' (specified: -1, actual 144896).
- Wrong file size specified in OVF descriptor for 'HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk6.vmdk' (specified: -1, actual 15863050240).
Completed successfully
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]#

Those warnings – which were not here last year on previous images- are really scary. If, like me you want to get rid off these, modify the ovf file.
First check the vmdk files size on disk:
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# ls -l *vmdk
-rw------- 1 root root  2258674176 Aug 12 08:30 HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk1.vmdk
-rw------- 1 root root  3552615424 Aug 12 08:35 HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk2.vmdk
-rw------- 1 root root  8894975488 Aug 12 08:53 HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk3.vmdk
-rw------- 1 root root  7227696640 Aug 12 09:04 HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk4.vmdk
-rw------- 1 root root      144896 Aug 12 09:04 HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk5.vmdk
-rw------- 1 root root 15863050240 Aug 12 09:24 HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk6.vmdk
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]#

Take all the size and add them into ovf file (ovf:size=…):
<File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk1.vmdk" ovf:id="file1" ovf:size="2258674176"/>
<File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk2.vmdk" ovf:id="file2" ovf:size="3552615424"/>
<File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk3.vmdk" ovf:id="file3" ovf:size="8894975488"/>
<File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk4.vmdk" ovf:id="file4" ovf:size="7227696640"/>
<File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk5.vmdk" ovf:id="file5" ovf:size="144896"/>
<File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk6.vmdk" ovf:id="file6" ovf:size="15863050240"/>

That’s it for the warning.

1.4 Start the VM
Unfortunately, despite ovftool specified a successful work, it’s not possible to boot the new VM. It systematically tries to boot from within the network card, ignoring all the hard drives. And of course, it fails.
 HCM92008_005

2. The systems’ disks are broken.
In the link of the other blog I mentioned above, someone found a way by setting the disk capacity to a dummy size, say 98Gb (see the comment). Using the option “diskMode=thin” of the ovftool properties, it should not be a problem in space. And it works.
2.1 The new ovf
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# diff HCMDB-SES-854-01.ovf HCMDB-SES-854-01.ovf.orig
4,9c4,9
<     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk1.vmdk" ovf:id="file1" ovf:size="2258674176"/>
<     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk2.vmdk" ovf:id="file2" ovf:size="3552615424"/>
<     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk3.vmdk" ovf:id="file3" ovf:size="8894975488"/>
<     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk4.vmdk" ovf:id="file4" ovf:size="7227696640"/>
<     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk5.vmdk" ovf:id="file5" ovf:size="144896"/>
<     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk6.vmdk" ovf:id="file6" ovf:size="15863050240"/>
---
>     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk1.vmdk" ovf:id="file1"/>
>     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk2.vmdk" ovf:id="file2"/>
>     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk3.vmdk" ovf:id="file3"/>
>     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk4.vmdk" ovf:id="file4"/>
>     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk5.vmdk" ovf:id="file5"/>
>     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk6.vmdk" ovf:id="file6"/>
13,18c13,18
<     <Disk ovf:capacity="107374182400" ovf:diskId="vmdisk1" ovf:fileRef="file1" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="34649586-c43a-4df3-af9c-2445fd543fdf"/>
<     <Disk ovf:capacity="107374182400" ovf:diskId="vmdisk2" ovf:fileRef="file2" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="f108476c-e701-49f8-b8f0-f6a2b4d6c4d5"/>
<     <Disk ovf:capacity="107374182400" ovf:diskId="vmdisk3" ovf:fileRef="file3" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="6ca0b490-9258-4643-888c-1b0722199fe5"/>
<     <Disk ovf:capacity="107374182400" ovf:diskId="vmdisk4" ovf:fileRef="file4" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="1a394121-3721-4d20-8c09-cd4f9b7f2053"/>
<     <Disk ovf:capacity="107374182400" ovf:diskId="vmdisk5" ovf:fileRef="file5" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="3bbbc232-080d-4536-916c-262fe5b2d379"/>
<     <Disk ovf:capacity="107374182400" ovf:diskId="vmdisk6" ovf:fileRef="file6" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="696b9eac-bbe8-4e49-84c2-c0c5d8b84480"/>
---
>     <Disk ovf:capacity="10092418560" ovf:diskId="vmdisk1" ovf:fileRef="file1" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="34649586-c43a-4df3-af9c-2445fd543fdf"/>
>     <Disk ovf:capacity="5782371840" ovf:diskId="vmdisk2" ovf:fileRef="file2" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="f108476c-e701-49f8-b8f0-f6a2b4d6c4d5"/>
>     <Disk ovf:capacity="41957153280" ovf:diskId="vmdisk3" ovf:fileRef="file3" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="6ca0b490-9258-4643-888c-1b0722199fe5"/>
>     <Disk ovf:capacity="15743185920" ovf:diskId="vmdisk4" ovf:fileRef="file4" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="1a394121-3721-4d20-8c09-cd4f9b7f2053"/>
>     <Disk ovf:capacity="24675840" ovf:diskId="vmdisk5" ovf:fileRef="file5" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="3bbbc232-080d-4536-916c-262fe5b2d379"/>
>     <Disk ovf:capacity="27793221120" ovf:diskId="vmdisk6" ovf:fileRef="file6" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="696b9eac-bbe8-4e49-84c2-c0c5d8b84480"/>
34c34
<     <OperatingSystemSection ovf:id="101">
---
>     <OperatingSystemSection ovf:id="109">
36,37c36,37
<       <Description>oracleLinux64Guest</Description>
<       <vbox:OSType ovf:required="false">oracleLinux64Guest</vbox:OSType>
---
>       <Description>Oracle_64</Description>
>       <vbox:OSType ovf:required="false">Oracle_64</vbox:OSType>
45c45
<         <vssd:VirtualSystemType>vmx-09</vssd:VirtualSystemType>
---
>         <vssd:VirtualSystemType>virtualbox-2.2</vssd:VirtualSystemType>
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]#

2.2 The ovftool file content (thin option is used)
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# cat .ovftool
lax
datastore=vm
skipManifestCheck
overwrite
powerOffTarget
net:HostOnly=VM Network 2
diskMode=thin
annotation=HCM9.2 - Peopletools 8.54.01
name=HCM92008

2.3 Push to ESXi
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# ovftool HCMDB-SES-854-01.ovf vi://root:pwd@192.168.1.10:443
Opening OVF source: HCMDB-SES-854-01.ovf
Opening VI target: vi://root@192.168.1.10:443/
Deleting VM: HCM92008
Deploying to VI: vi://root@192.168.1.10:443/
Transfer Completed
Completed successfully
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]#

2.4 Boot of the new VM
HCM92008_009

HCM92008_015
Then you are back to the business and prompted to setup your brand new VM.

3. Capacity from vmdk file
Setting a larger value than needed is fine but a bit hazardous.
Looking in the vmdk file, we also can see the real disk capacity of the target. For instance, here for the disk1:
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# cat HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk1.vmdk|more
KDMV

version=1
CID=aa3d0432
parentCID=ffffffff
createType="streamOptimized"

# Extent description
RDONLY 19711755 SPARSE "HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk1.vmdk"
The size is in Kb, so it should be 19711755*1024=20184837120.
”Surprisingly”, it’s exactly the double of the specified capacity in the original ovf file for the disk1. And the same is true for all the other disks.
Using that size’s capacity is also a failure… Same as above, it’s booting from within the network.

4. Size from vmdk disk
WMWare is coming with a small tool, vmware-mount (version 5.1). Very useful in our case.
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# for i in `ls |grep vmdk`
> do
> echo $i
> vmware-mount -p $i
> done
HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk1.vmdk
Nr      Start       Size Type Id Sytem
-- ---------- ---------- ---- -- ------------------------
1         63     530082 BIOS 83 Linux
2     530145   10779615 BIOS 83 Linux
3   11309760    8401995 BIOS 82 Linux swap
HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk2.vmdk
Nr      Start       Size Type Id Sytem
-- ---------- ---------- ---- -- ------------------------
1         63   11293632 BIOS 83 Linux
HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk3.vmdk
Nr      Start       Size Type Id Sytem
-- ---------- ---------- ---- -- ------------------------
1         63   81947502 BIOS 83 Linux
HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk4.vmdk
Nr      Start       Size Type Id Sytem
-- ---------- ---------- ---- -- ------------------------
1         63   30748347 BIOS 83 Linux
HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk5.vmdk
Nr      Start       Size Type Id Sytem
-- ---------- ---------- ---- -- ------------------------
1         63      48132 BIOS 83 Linux
HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk6.vmdk
Nr      Start       Size Type Id Sytem
-- ---------- ---------- ---- -- ------------------------
1         63   54283572 BIOS 83 Linux

The size is given in Kb.
Let’s take the first, (530082+10779615+8401995)*1024=20184772608
Ok, we are not that far from the double of the original size (from vmdk, see above), are we ? See.
20184837120 (original capacity) – 20184772608 = 64512. And 64512 is nothing but 63 (start) *1024…

Verifying on the second drive:
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# cat HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk2.vmdk|more
KDMV

version=1
CID=8bdea51b
parentCID=ffffffff
createType="streamOptimized"

# Extent description
RDONLY 11293695 SPARSE "HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk2.vmdk"

11293695 * 1024 = 11564743680 (in other word original capacity*2, 5782371840*2).
Then, from the last output of vmware-mount, we have 11293632*1024=11564679168.
11564743680 - 11564679168 = 64512. Again.

So, I think we are safe to say the required capacity should be the double of the initial capacity minus 64512.

5. Let’s have a new try with this hypothesis.
5.1 New ovf
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# diff HCMDB-SES-854-01.ovf HCMDB-SES-854-01.ovf.orig
4,9c4,9
<     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk1.vmdk" ovf:id="file1" ovf:size="2258674176"/>
<     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk2.vmdk" ovf:id="file2" ovf:size="3552615424"/>
<     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk3.vmdk" ovf:id="file3" ovf:size="8894975488"/>
<     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk4.vmdk" ovf:id="file4" ovf:size="7227696640"/>
<     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk5.vmdk" ovf:id="file5" ovf:size="144896"/>
<     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk6.vmdk" ovf:id="file6" ovf:size="15863050240"/>
---
>     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk1.vmdk" ovf:id="file1"/>
>     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk2.vmdk" ovf:id="file2"/>
>     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk3.vmdk" ovf:id="file3"/>
>     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk4.vmdk" ovf:id="file4"/>
>     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk5.vmdk" ovf:id="file5"/>
>     <File ovf:href="HCMDB-SES-854-01-disk6.vmdk" ovf:id="file6"/>
13,18c13,18
<     <Disk ovf:capacity="20184772608" ovf:diskId="vmdisk1" ovf:fileRef="file1" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="34649586-c43a-4df3-af9c-2445fd543fdf"/>
<     <Disk ovf:capacity="11564679168" ovf:diskId="vmdisk2" ovf:fileRef="file2" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="f108476c-e701-49f8-b8f0-f6a2b4d6c4d5"/>
<     <Disk ovf:capacity="83914242048" ovf:diskId="vmdisk3" ovf:fileRef="file3" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="6ca0b490-9258-4643-888c-1b0722199fe5"/>
<     <Disk ovf:capacity="31486307328" ovf:diskId="vmdisk4" ovf:fileRef="file4" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="1a394121-3721-4d20-8c09-cd4f9b7f2053"/>
<     <Disk ovf:capacity="49287168" ovf:diskId="vmdisk5" ovf:fileRef="file5" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="3bbbc232-080d-4536-916c-262fe5b2d379"/>
<     <Disk ovf:capacity="55586377728" ovf:diskId="vmdisk6" ovf:fileRef="file6" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="696b9eac-bbe8-4e49-84c2-c0c5d8b84480"/>
---
>     <Disk ovf:capacity="10092418560" ovf:diskId="vmdisk1" ovf:fileRef="file1" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="34649586-c43a-4df3-af9c-2445fd543fdf"/>
>     <Disk ovf:capacity="5782371840" ovf:diskId="vmdisk2" ovf:fileRef="file2" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="f108476c-e701-49f8-b8f0-f6a2b4d6c4d5"/>
>     <Disk ovf:capacity="41957153280" ovf:diskId="vmdisk3" ovf:fileRef="file3" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="6ca0b490-9258-4643-888c-1b0722199fe5"/>
>     <Disk ovf:capacity="15743185920" ovf:diskId="vmdisk4" ovf:fileRef="file4" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="1a394121-3721-4d20-8c09-cd4f9b7f2053"/>
>     <Disk ovf:capacity="24675840" ovf:diskId="vmdisk5" ovf:fileRef="file5" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="3bbbc232-080d-4536-916c-262fe5b2d379"/>
>     <Disk ovf:capacity="27793221120" ovf:diskId="vmdisk6" ovf:fileRef="file6" ovf:format="
http://www.vmware.com/interfaces/specifications/vmdk.html#streamOptimized" vbox:uuid="696b9eac-bbe8-4e49-84c2-c0c5d8b84480"/>
34c34
<     <OperatingSystemSection ovf:id="101">
---
>     <OperatingSystemSection ovf:id="109">
36,37c36,37
<       <Description>oracleLinux64Guest</Description>
<       <vbox:OSType ovf:required="false">oracleLinux64Guest</vbox:OSType>
---
>       <Description>Oracle_64</Description>
>       <vbox:OSType ovf:required="false">Oracle_64</vbox:OSType>
45c45
<         <vssd:VirtualSystemType>vmx-09</vssd:VirtualSystemType>
---
>         <vssd:VirtualSystemType>virtualbox-2.2</vssd:VirtualSystemType>
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]#

5.2 ovftool control file
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# cat .ovftool
lax
datastore=vm
skipManifestCheck
overwrite
powerOffTarget
net:HostOnly=VM Network 2
diskMode=thin
annotation=HCM9.2 - Peopletools 8.54.01
name=HCM92008

5.3 Push to ESXi
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]# ovftool HCMDB-SES-854-01.ovf vi://root:pwd@192.168.1.10:443
Opening OVF source: HCMDB-SES-854-01.ovf
Opening VI target: vi://root@192.168.1.10:443/
Deploying to VI: vi://root@192.168.1.10:443/
Transfer Completed
Completed successfully
[root@omsa:/nfs/software/PeopleSoftCD/OVA/HCM-920-UPD-008_OVA]#


5.4 Booting VM
The new VM starts as expected. Back to normal.


Ok, I hope it is clear, briefly speaking, in the ovf file change the capacity as (capacity*2)-64512 for each file.

Successfully tested on HCM92008 and FSCM92008 images.

Nicolas.